BFA Curriculum Guide

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English

English Curriculum

 

Once you allow yourself to identify with the people in a story, then you might begin to see yourself in that story even if on the surface it's far removed from your situation. This is what I try to tell my students: this is one great thing that literature can do - it can make us identify with situations and people far away.Chinua AchebeThe English curriculum at BFA has been carefully designed to lead our students to mastery of American, British, and World Literature and Composition. Students read extensively in many genres, and practice analytical techniques in small groups and one-on-one discussions with their instructors. At the heart of our English curriculum, is our belief that every student can, and should, become a great writer. In different modes of composition, we focus on developing vocabulary, grammar, and usage, secure in the knowledge that one of the greatest gifts a student can leave high school with is an ability to write.

In addition, Ben Franklin offers capable juniors and seniors who are looking to challenge themselves the opportunity to take Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, and Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition.

English 9

This course is comprised of four units: The Short Story, Drama, Mythology, and Poetry. Students will work with teachers to read the selected works closely and explore the connections within and between the units. Each unit has four sections: Literature, Grammar, Composition, and Vocabulary.

Honors English 9

This course is comprised of four units: The Short Story, Drama, Mythology, and Poetry. Each unit has four sections: Literature, Grammar, Composition, and Vocabulary. Advanced students will work with teachers to read the selected works closely. Their reading responses and papers will be expected to show a deeper understanding of and ability to synthesize the ideas within and between the units through deeper writing and discussion.

Honors English 11

This course covers the literature of Americans from 1000 C.E. to the present time. Students will read poetry, essays, short stories, novels, and plays representing major movements in American Literature.  This course incorporates grammar and usage instruction into the writing process. The course emphasizes appropriate composition skills in book reports, essay writing and research papers, including proper citation of sources.  Honors students will work with teachers to read the selected works closely. Their reading responses and papers will be expected to show a deeper understanding of and ability to synthesize the ideas within and between the units through deeper writing and discussion.

English 10

This course is comprised of four units: The Short Story, Drama, Essay (Non-Fiction), and Poetry. Students will work with teachers to read the selected works closely and explore the connections within and between the units. Each unit has four sections: Literature, Grammar, Composition, and Vocabulary.

Honors English 10

This course is comprised of five units: The Short Story, Drama, Fiction, The Essay (Non-Fiction), and Poetry. Each unit has four sections: Literature, Grammar, Composition, and Vocabulary. Honors students will work with teachers to read the selected works closely. Their reading responses and papers will be expected to show a deeper understanding of and ability to synthesize the ideas within and between the units through deeper writing and discussion.

English 11

This course covers the literature of Americans from 1000 C.E. to the present time. Students will read poetry, essays, short stories, novels, and plays representing major movements in American Literature.  This course incorporates grammar and usage instruction into the writing process. The course emphasizes appropriate composition skills in book reports, essay writing and research papers, including proper citation of sources.

English 12

This course covers literature from around the world between 4500 B.C.E. to the present time. Students will read poetry, essays, short stories, novels and plays representing a variety of major movements, eras, and cultural and literary traditions.  This course emphasizes the critical analysis of literature and the further development of skills in expository writing and research.  The course integrates the study of grammar and usage into the writing process.

Honors English 12

This course covers literature from around the world between 4500 B.C.E. to the present time Students will read poetry, essays, short stories, novels and plays representing a variety of major movements, eras, and cultural and literary traditions.  Students will also read literary criticism and engage in research. This course emphasizes the critical analysis of literature and the further development of skills in expository writing and research. This course is writing-intensive and integrates the study of grammar and usage into the writing process.  This course also includes a comparative element in which students will analyze and compare selections from various cultures. 

British Literature

This course covers British literature and culture from the Old English through the modern period. The course also has a comparative element in which students will read selections from world literature. Students will read poetry, prose, novels, and plays and complete grammar, vocabulary, and writing assignments. This course is writing-intensive.

Honors British Literature

This course covers British literature and culture from the Old English through the modern period. The course also has a comparative element in which students will read selections from world literature. Students will read poetry, prose, novels, and plays and complete grammar, vocabulary, and writing assignments. Students will also read literary criticism and perform research. This course is writing-intensive.

AP English Language and Composition

This course is designed as a college-level class, focusing on nonfiction written in English, in a variety of modes (essays, journalism, political writing, science writing, nature writing, biography/autobiography, diaries, history, and criticism). The course emphasizes students’ development as both critical readers and polished writers, and students write copiously in descriptive, narrative, expository, analytical, and argumentative modes. Students’ writing and reading will make them aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course adheres to the most recent AP English Course Description, published by the College Board. 

AP English Literature and Composition

This course is designed as a college-level class, covering poetry, fiction, drama, and criticism, primarily written in English, with an emphasis on producing advanced critical analyses of literature. The course emphasizes students’ development as both critical readers and polished writers, and students write copiously in descriptive, narrative, expository, analytical, and argumentative modes. Students’ writing and reading will make them aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course will adhere to the most recent AP English Course Description, published by the College Board.

Science

Science Curriculum

Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of imaginationJohn Dewey

At BFA, we haven’t forgotten what it was like the first time we learned to distinguish different plants by their leaf patterns, or the thrill of watching chemicals react before our eyes, or the moment we really understood how gravity works. Our science teachers are experts at getting students to experience the joys of discovery, whether in introductory core courses and labs, or in the many challenging Advanced Placement science courses we offer.

Biology

This course is intended for students seeking an introduction to the life sciences. The course covers the fundamentals of cell theory, cellular reproduction, genetics, evolution, and biological classification, and provides an overview of each of the biological kingdoms from bacteria to animals.

Honors Biology

This course is intended for students seeking a more intensive introduction to the life sciences. The course covers the fundamentals of cell theory, cellular reproduction, genetics, evolution, and biological classification, and provides an overview of each of the biological kingdoms from bacteria to animals.

AP Biology

AP Biology is a college-level Biology course taught for college credit.  The course provides the opportunity for students to learn modern biology concepts and knowledge with inquiry-based investigations on the topics of evolution, energy and communication in cellular processes, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions.  The course emphasizes critical thinking and the historical development of modern biological understanding, as well as technological developments that support biological research and applications of biological concepts in social, economic, and environmental contexts. 

Chemistry

 This chemistry course covers the fundamental concepts of classical chemistry. By conducting experiments, students can apply the textbook materials to the world. We will cover selected chapters of the text with emphasis on components of matter (atomic theory), forms of matters, atomic structure, kinetic theory, gas laws, acid and base, chemical calculations, and solution.

Honors Chemistry

Honors Chemistry is designed to provide students with a strong college preparatory course in chemistry. This faster-paced and more comprehensive course covers content of first year college chemistry and is designed to prepare students for college chemistry. In-depth laboratory investigation and analysis of experimental data comprise a significant part of this course as does the use of technology. Students may have taken either Chemistry previously, as this is either a second-year course or advanced course, undertaking an ambitious investigation of the principles of Chemistry.

Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry is designed to be taken only after the successful completion of a first course in high school chemistry or the ambitious student. In addition, the recommended mathematics prerequisite for Honors Chemistry class is the successful completion of a second year algebra course and permission of instructor.

AP Chemistry

AP Chemistry is designed to provide students with a strong college-level chemistry course. This fast-paced course covers the Advanced Placement curriculum in Chemistry and is designed to prepare students for the AP Chemistry exam in the spring. In-depth laboratory investigation and analysis of experimental data are central to this course as is the use of technology. Students should have taken either Chemistry or Honors Chemistry previously, as this is a second-year course, and be prepared for an in-depth and ambitious investigation of the principles of Chemistry.

Prerequisites: The AP Chemistry course is designed to be taken only after the successful completion of a first course in high school chemistry, therefore in addition, the recommended mathematics prerequisite for AP Chemistry class is the successful completion of a second year algebra course and permission of instructor.

Physics

The course is an introduction to the principles and concepts of physics. The course consists of six parts and is organized in a standard fashion. It covers the following sections: Newtonian Mechanics, Fluids, Thermodynamics, Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics. The course includes hands-on laboratory investigations conducted by students.

Honors Physics

The course is one-year physics course and is intended for students seeking in-depth understanding of basic principles and concepts of physics. It covers topics of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluids, Thermodynamics, Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics. The course includes hands-on laboratory investigations conducted by students. Successful completion of Algebra II and Trigonometry is desirable but not required.

AP Physics

AP Physics course is non-calculus based one-year physics course that covers a wide spectrum of topics, including Newtonian mechanics, Fluids, Thermodynamics, Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics. It is equivalent to introductory algebra-based university level physics course. The course also includes minimum 12 hands-on laboratory investigations conducted by students.

Physical Science

Physical science is a course designed to provide its students with a broadly scientific preparatory grammar with all areas of science. The course introduces philosophical enquiry via Scientific Prolegamemnon.  Supplemental and ancillary topics requiring more in-depth investigation and analysis of scientific fact or data comprise a significant part of this course as does the use of technology. There is no prerequisite for physical science, however given the normal curriculum track for a student of this level, he should have  be generally acquainted with algebra and geometry.

Honors Physical Science

Physical science is a course designed to provide its students with a broadly scientific preparatory grammar with all areas of science. The course introduces philosophical enquiry via Scientific Prolegamemnon.  Supplemental and ancillary topics requiring more in-depth investigation and analysis of scientific fact or data comprise a significant part of this course as does the use of technology. There is no prerequisite for physical science, however given the normal curriculum track for a student of this level, he should be acquainted with algebra and geometry.

Zoology

This course is intended for students seeking to learn more about animals and the animal kingdom. The course covers the fundamentals of evolutionary theory, animal behavior and ecology, animal taxonomy, protozoa and the evolutionary precursors of animal life, and animal body structure and physiology. The major portion of the course is devoted to detailed studies of the major animal groups.

Honors Zoology

This course is intended for students seeking a more in-depth introduction to animals and the animal kingdom. The course is a rigorous exploration of the fundamentals of evolutionary theory, animal behavior and ecology, animal taxonomy, protozoa and the evolutionary precursors of animal life, and animal body structure and physiology. The major portion of the course is devoted to detailed studies of the major animal groups. An honors research paper is a requirement.

Marine Biology

This course is a general introduction to the biology of marine life, including an introduction to the physical marine environment, marine ecology, human interactions with marine life, estuarine and coral reef habitats, marine vertebrates and migration, sensory reception and reproduction in nekton.

Honors Marine Biology

This course offers a more intensive introduction to the biology of marine life, including an introduction to the physical marine environment, marine ecology, human interactions with marine life, estuarine and coral reef habitats, marine vertebrates and migration, and sensory reception and reproduction in nekton. It is intended for students who have completed courses in  biology and chemistry.

Environmental Science

This course covers environmental issues and their causes, environmental history, environmental science and critical thinking, ecosystems, evolution and biodiversity, biogeography, aquatic ecology, community ecology, food and water resources, geologic resources, renewable energy sources, air pollution, pesticides and pest control, sustainability of wild species, sustainability of cities, environmental ethics, personal impact on environmental issues, and schoolyard as ecosystem.

Honors Environmental Science

This course covers environmental issues and their causes, environmental history, environmental science and critical thinking, ecosystems, evolution and biodiversity, biogeography, aquatic ecology, community ecology, food and water resources, geologic resources, renewable energy sources, air pollution, pesticides and pest control, sustainability of wild species, sustainability of cities, environmental ethics, personal impact on environmental issues, and schoolyard as ecosystem. Open inquiry labs allow students to design investigations into student-directed questions with guidance from the teacher.  This course will also hold students to a higher standard and prepare them to take the AP Environmental Science exam, administered by the College Board.

AP Environmental Science

This course covers environmental issues and their causes, environmental history, environmental science and critical thinking, ecosystems, evolution and biodiversity, biogeography, aquatic ecology, community ecology, food and water resources, geologic resources, renewable energy sources, air pollution, pesticides and pest control, sustainability of wild species, sustainability of cities, environmental ethics, personal impact on environmental issues, and schoolyard as ecosystem. This course will also hold students to a higher standard and prepare them to take the AP Environmental Science exam, administered by the College Board.

Human Anatomy and Physiology

This course is intended for students seeking an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course covers the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology including hierarchies of structure (cell, tissue, organ, etc.), homeostatic mechanisms, categories of disease, and body directional terms. The majority of the course is devoted to the detailed study of major body systems, including the muscular, skeletal, integumentary, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, excretory and reproductive systems.

Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology

This course is a more intensive introduction to the principles of human anatomy and physiology.  It covers the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology including hierarchies of structure (cell, tissue, organ, etc.), homeostatic mechanisms, categories of disease, and body directional terms. The majority of the course is devoted to the detailed study of major body systems, including the muscular, skeletal, integumentary, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, excretory and reproductive systems.  This honors course emphasizes the interplay between different body systems for the maintenance of homeostasis. It is intended for students who have completed courses in biology and chemistry.

Introduction to Engineering

The Introduction to Engineering Course will give students an understanding of the field of Engineering.  Students will learn about each of the different disciplines within the field of Engineering, the design process, and the profession.  They will do this in a hands on fashion by completing a series of lab activities.

Forensic Science

This course is an introduction to the principles and techniques of modern forensic science.

Animal Behavior

This course is an introduction to the study of animal behavior.  It will range from the history of animal behavior through the changing view of behavior in the twenty-first century. For each unit there will be a lab, video or extra readings (sometimes all three.)

Microbiology

This course is a basic introduction to microbiology. Students will learn to identify both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, using both prepared and live specimens. Basic histology will also be covered, using prepared animal and plant tissue.

Mathematics

Mathematics Curriculum

"The essence of mathematics is not to make simple things complicated, but to make complicated things simple."S. Gudder

At Ben Franklin, we may be innovators in many areas, but we have remained true to the core belief that every student can and will succeed when given the individualized education that he or she deserves. Nowhere is this truer than in math.  We offer math courses from Pre-Algebra to AP Calculs AB and AP Calculus BC as well as AP Statistics.

Pre-Algebra

This course covers integers, variables and expressions, equations, factorization, exponents, multiplying and dividing fractions, fractions with like denominators, fractions with unlike denominators, ratios and proportions, probability, rational numbers, percents, interest and discount problems.

Algebra I

This course covers simplifying algebraic expressions, distributive property, positive and negative integers,  number lines, absolute values,  adding expressions, subtracting expressions, dividing expressions, multiplying expressions, solving equations, translating English to Algebra,  solving word problems, percent problems, solving equations involving inequalities, working with powers and polynomials, factoring polynomials and an introduction to solving rational expressions.

Honors Algebra I

This course covers problem solving: moving objects, money, mixture, wind, current, rates of work, finding maximum and minimum values, linear models, simplifying radicals, vectors, complex roots, odd and even functions, circles, ellipse, hyperbola, parabola, inverse functions and exponential functions.

Geometry

This course covers geometry basics, proofs, transversals, congruent triangles, polygons, quadrilaterals, similarity, right triangles, coordinate geometry, areas, circles, circles and volumes.

Honors Geometry

Honors Geometry is an alternative to Geometry for highly motivated mathematics students. The greater depth, breadth and rigor of the course is intended to prepare students for success in Honors Algebra II and AP Calculus. Accordingly, the curriculum is designed for students with a strong mathematics background who are able to commit to the additional homework and study time that may be required. To enhance this course, students will be expected to do projects to prove a deeper understanding of the concepts.

Algebra II

This course covers a review of Algebra, linear equations and inequalities, functions, solving linear systems of equations, factoring polynomials, solving word problems, synthetic division, evaluating rational expressions, simplifying radicals and rational exponents, simplifying complex numbers, finding discriminates and applying coordinate geometry.

Honors Algebra II

Honors Algebra II is our most advanced study in second year algebraic concepts and applications. Students will be prepared for success on standardized test. Most students will be advised to continue their advanced mathematics instruction with PreCalculus or AP Statistics. To enhance this course, students will be expected to do projects to prove a deeper understanding of the concepts.

Algebra III

This course covers basic concepts of algebra, coordinate of geometry, straight lines, systems of linear equations, circles, functions, quadratic functions, transformation of curves, radicals,  rational exponents, logarithms, synthetic division, graphing polynomial functions, graphing rational functions.

Pre-Calculus

This course covers basic concepts of algebra, coordinate of geometry, straight lines, systems of linear equations, circles, functions, quadratic functions, transformation of curves, radicals,  rational exponents, logarithms, synthetic division, graphing polynomial functions, graphing rational functions, geometric functions, trigonometric functions, sine and cosine curves, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, law of sine,  law of cosines, arithmetic sequences, geometric sequences, matrices, determinants and Cramer’s rule.

Calculus

The Calculus course is an introduction to the topics of calculus. As such, it covers the theory and applications of the concepts of functions, limits, derivatives, and integrals. We will follow the course outline as listed and use our textbooks.  

Statistics

The course is an introduction to the principles and concepts of statistics. The course is intended for students seeking a basic understanding of the principles of probability and statistics. The course covers the major concepts and techniques for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.

Honors Statistics

In this course, we will emphasize statistical thinking. There are four main areas of study; exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. We will try to understand the meaning behind the data as it applies to individuals and populations. We will be actively reading our textbook and actively work with problems.

AP Statistics

AP Statistics is the high school equivalent of a one semester, introductory college statistics course. In this course, students develop strategies for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Students design, administer, and tabulate results from surveys and experiments. Probability and simulations aid students in constructing models for chance phenomena. Sampling distributions provide the logical structure for confidence intervals and hypothesis tests.  Students use a TI-83/84 graphing calculator, Microsoft Excel statistical software, and Web-based java applets to investigate statistical concepts.  To develop effective statistical communication skills, students are required to prepare frequent written and oral analyses of real data.

AP Calculus AB

The AP Calculus course is a first year college level introduction to the topics of calculus. As such, it covers the theory and applications of the concepts of functions, limits, derivatives, and integrals. We will follow the course outline as listed and use our textbook.  

Discrete Mathematics/ Advanced Mathematical Decision Making

This is a course designed to follow the completion of Algebra II. The course will give students further experiences with statistical information and summaries, methods of designing and conducting statistical studies, an opportunity to analyze various voting processes, recursion, trig, and regression models for modeling data, basic financial decisions, and use network models for making informed decisions.

Foreign Language

Foreign Language Curriculum

American Sign Language at Ben Franklin Academy

One language sets you in a corridor for life. Two languages open every door along the way.Frank Smith

American Sign Language

This course is an introduction to American Sign Language, the language used by Deaf people in the United States and most of Canada.  This course will also provide introductory information on Deaf culture, since a language cannot be separated from its culture. 

Chinese I

This course is designed to introduce students to basic Chinese and develop language skills and culture.  This course consists of 10 lessons.

Chinese II

This course is designed to introduce students to intermediate Chinese and develop language skills and culture. This course consists of reviewing Chinese I materials and 8 new lessons.

Chinese III

This course is designed to help you to begin gaining mastery of all basic skills in Mandarin Chinese (speaking, listening, reading and writing) as well as the cultural context in which they are used. Our focus is on communicative competence and accuracy. Our goal is to help you to learn to communicate effectively with real Chinese speakers. After Mandarin I, you’ll be able to carry on simple conversations with Mandarin speakers, handle some key daily life situations like asking directions, ordering foods at the restaurants and buying necessities in shops and markets. You’ll also be able to write about 300 Chinese characters.

French I

The general goal of French 1 is to familiarize students with basic vocabulary,  oral skills, and grammatical structures of the French language, as well as to introduce the student to French-speaking cultures.

French II

The general goal of French 2 is to use a new skills to communicate in meaningful, open-ended activities, to familiarize students with new vocabulary as their practice the new structure points, oral skills, and grammatical structures of the French language, as well as to introduce the student to French-speaking cultures.

French III

French IV

German I

Auf Deutsch! is an integrated program of print, Fokus Deutsch video series, audio, and technology. This exciting, three-level German program for high school: Integrates technology through videos that immerse students in authentic language and culture, presents language clearly, concisely, and in context for more accurate communication, encourages retention with language, culture, and study strategies, adapts to varied learning styles and ability levels.

German II

German III

German IV

This course will use German in Review.  German in Review contains clear, step-by-step explanations of grammatical structures and carefully sequenced exercises that allow students to reacquaint themselves with the essentials of modern German from the ground up. Most chapters are divided into levels, permitting students either to begin with a basic review of the topics at hand or to proceed immediately to more advanced material. The course is designed so that students of varying backgrounds will be able to begin German IV on solid ground. The German in Review Student Manual presents learners with a series of additional exercises that will confirm and extend what they have already accomplished on their own.

            Deutschland: Ein Neuer Anfang is a German cultural reader for intermediate students of German. It offers an up-to-date overview of German culture, civilization, and history—stretching from the period of the Germanic tribes and extending all the way into the 1990’s. Students will become acquainted with German achievements in literature, music, philosophy, science, art, and politics. In addition to this historical perspective, special attention has also been paid to the views and lifestyles of Germany’s current generation of young people. To insure ease of reading, numerous vocabulary notes are provided in the margins of the text pages, along with a general German-English Vocabulary found at the back of the book. Fragen at the end of each unit subsection serve to check understanding and stimulate discussion.

AP German

This course aims to prepare students for the AP exam on a high and challenging level. The course objective is to perfect the four skills of language and learning:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural material is also emphasized. The course seeks to develop useful language skills that are not limited to a specific subject. Students should learn to apply German language to various activities and disciplines. My goal is to develop the highest level of fluency possible for all students. Class is conducted in German and students are also expected to speak only in the target language.  All students are encouraged throughout their German studies to practice in the target language consistently with their teachers and peers. The use of English is not permitted.

Greek I

The goal of Greek I is to familiarize students with basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and translation techniques of the Greek language, as well as introduce the students to various aspects of Greek culture including, but not limited to, mythology, history, art, and daily life.

Latin I

The goal of Latin I is to familiarize students with basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and translation techniques of the Latin language, as well as introduce the students to various aspects of Roman culture including, but not limited to, mythology, history, art, and daily life.

Latin II

The goal of Latin II is to familiarize students with more advanced vocabulary, grammatical structures, and translation techniques of the Latin language, as well as introduce the students to various aspects of Roman culture including, but not limited to, mythology, history, art, and daily life.

Latin III

In Latin III, the students will complete the final chapters in Wheelock and transition into translating texts of either Cicero or Julius Caesar.  Both authors wrote during a time of great upheaval as Rome was transitioning from a republic to an empire.  In addition to translating the texts, the students will learn about the historical background which surrounds these authors, and they will be able to place the texts into a historical context.

Latin IV

In Latin IV, the students will read the poetry of either Ovid and Catullus or Vergil.  The class will focus on translation while also introducing the students to meter, poetic devices, and the historical context in which the poets were writing.  In addition to translating the poems, the students will also read them in English in order to interpret their meaning.

AP Latin

This year-long course covers the content of the AP Latin exam. The majority of class time will be spent going over the translation assignments in Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and Vergil’s Aeneid. Students are expected to first read the Latin out loud with correct inflection and then translate as literally as possible, answering my questions about grammar and syntax. In the second semester, students will be expected to regularly scan sections of Vergil. Daily class discussion will hone students’ ability to discuss the primary texts, ensuring comprehension and understanding of context, literary devices, themes, etc. Attention will be paid to students’ use of proper terminology in discussion. If we do not get time to sufficiently discuss the text in class, I will assign short written responses to specific questions about the Latin readings. Students will be encouraged to put discussion of the primary text into the context of the entirety of the work. I will ask for specific references back to sections of Caesar and Vergil that were read in English at the beginning of each semester. Essay writing opportunities, translation and discussion in class, and regular practice with the full AP format (midterms and finals) will prepare students to take the AP Latin exam at the end of the year.

Russian I

Russian provides a balanced approach, integrating current and useful vocabulary with basic grammar explanations derived directly from a storyline for students who are beginning Russian. In addition to that it carefully designed to develop and improve communication skills throughout the course. It also introduces students to contemporary Russian culture and society with reflection of recent developments and current issues in Russia.

Russian II

This class provides a balanced approach, integrating current and useful vocabulary with basic grammar explanations derived directly from a storyline for students who are on intermediate stages of learning Russian language. In addition to that it carefully designed to develop and improve communication skills throughout the course. It also introduces students to contemporary Russian culture and society with reflection of recent developments and current issues in Russia.

Spanish I

In this course, the student will begin their Spanish study through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities that are in line with the National Foreign Language Standards. Topics include culture in the Spanish-speaking world, syllabication, and an introduction to grammar. Vocabulary terms learned will address greetings, the family, colors, and numbers among others. Throughout the course, students learn to communicate with a growing vocabulary and increasingly-complex grammar. Exercises and in-class activities have been designed with methods that have proven to be effective and create a long-lasting impact on the student’s learning. To facilitate learning and long-term retention, the teacher uses English to trigger Spanish, basing her teaching in cognates and providing strategies for making connections between both languages. The course is taught in Spanish to immerse students and encourage them to apply their knowledge of the language in various situations. Students are guided into fully comprehending and expressing themselves in Spanish from the beginning of the course. Our mission is to guarantee a stress-free environment in which students feel comfortable and eager to learn.

Spanish II

In this course, the student will build upon the skills gained in Spanish I. Students will learn to express themselves with a wide vocabulary and a better understanding of grammatical principles that are in line with the National Foreign Language Standards. Topics include verb cognates, progressive verbs, differentiating between the use of similar verbs, and the conjugation of irregular verbs. Exercises and in-class activities have been designed with methods that have proven to be effective and create a long-lasting impact on the student’s learning. To facilitate learning and long-term retention, the teacher uses English to trigger Spanish, basing her teaching in cognates and providing strategies for making connections between both languages. The course is taught in Spanish to immerse students and encourage them to apply their knowledge of the language in various situations. Students are guided into fully comprehending and expressing themselves in Spanish from the beginning of the course. Our mission is to guarantee a stress-free environment in which students feel comfortable and eager to learn.

Spanish III

In this course, the student will practice and continue expanding on the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills learned in Spanish I and Spanish II. Topics include improving knowledge on grammatical principles such as present, past, future, and conditional-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Culture is also incorporated into the class with exercises about famous festivities and traditions of the Spanish-speaking world. Exercises and in-class activities have been designed with methods that have proven to be effective and create a long-lasting impact on the student’s learning. To facilitate learning and long-term retention, the teacher uses English to trigger Spanish, basing her teaching in cognates and providing strategies for making connections between both languages. The course is taught in Spanish to immerse students and encourage them to apply their knowledge of the language in various situations. Students are guided into fully comprehending and expressing themselves in Spanish from the beginning of the course. Our mission is to guarantee a stress-free environment in which students feel comfortable and eager to learn.

Spanish IV

In this course, students will develop the skills previously learned in other levels of Spanish. They will continue to sharpen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Topics will include expanding on verb tenses for both regular and irregular verbs and improving the student’s communication skills. Throughout the course, students will communicate using a growing vocabulary and increased confidence with grammatical principles. They will use present, past, future, and conditional, and subjunctive-tense verbs to further communicate. Exercises and in-class activities have been designed with methods that have proven to be effective and create a long-lasting impact on the student’s learning. To facilitate learning and long-term retention, the teacher uses English to trigger Spanish, basing her teaching in cognates and providing strategies for making connections between both languages. The course is taught in Spanish to immerse students and encourage them to apply their knowledge of the language in various situations. Students are guided into fully comprehending and expressing themselves in Spanish from the beginning of the course. Our mission is to guarantee a stress-free environment in which students feel comfortable and eager to learn.

Spanish V

In this course, students will continue developing their Spanish language skills. Students will gain a greater understanding of the unique cultural aspects of each Spanish-speaking country and master verb-tenses for the most commonly-used verbs in the Spanish language. The ultimate goal of this course is to enrich the students with a plethora of knowledge, preparing them for university-level Spanish and beyond. Exercises and in-class activities have been designed with methods that have proven to be effective and create a long-lasting impact on the student’s learning. To facilitate learning and long-term retention, the teacher uses English to trigger Spanish, basing her teaching in cognates and providing strategies for making connections between both languages. The course is taught in Spanish to immerse students and encourage them to apply their knowledge of the language in various situations. Students are guided into fully comprehending and expressing themselves in Spanish from the beginning of the course. Our mission is to guarantee a stress-free environment in which students feel comfortable and eager to learn.

AP Spanish Language

This course emphasizes communication by applying listening, reading, and writing skills in the Spanish language. Skills developed include vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. Students will also develop a greater understanding of the Spanish-speaking world in a contemporary and historical context. Social interactions, values, attitudes, music, and other cultural products are all studied. Exercises and in-class activities have been designed with methods that have proven to be effective and create a long-lasting impact on the student’s learning. To facilitate learning and long-term retention, the teacher uses English to trigger Spanish, basing her teaching in cognates and providing strategies for making connections between both languages. The course is taught in Spanish to immerse students and encourage them to apply their knowledge of the language in various situations. Students are guided into fully comprehending and expressing themselves in Spanish from the beginning of the course. Our mission is to guarantee a stress-free environment in which students feel comfortable and eager to learn.

Humanities

Humanities Curriculum

History for human self-knowledge...the only clue to what man can do is what man has done. The value of history, then, is that it teaches us what man has done and thus what man is.R.G. Collingwood
At BFA, our Humanities curriculum is both broad in scope and comprehensive in content. The curriculum prepares students to be a part of a culturally complex, changing world.  Our Humanities teachers prepare students to use tools to analyze human behavior in the past to build understandings of contemporary times. Through engaging with history, psychology, and philosopy, we hope that BFA students become responsible global citizens.

World Geography

The World Geography course exists to introduce the variety of concepts and features of the planet. It introduces all the terrains to students and as a result how those terrains effect humans and vice versa. It covers the extensive survey of natural resources on the planet and the history of these resources and how modern civilization has manipulated and transplanted some of these for the advancement of the human race. The course also covers in depth the names of labels of specific places and geographical landmarks around the planet, as well as the change of the name of some of these specific locations.

Honors World Geography

The Honors World Geography course exists to give a more rigorous introduction into the variety of concepts and features of the planet. It introduces all the geographical terrains to students. Students and the instructor will discuss how those terrains affect humans and vice versa. It covers the extensive survey of natural resources on the planet and the history of these resources and how modern civilization has manipulated and transplanted some of these for the advancement of the human race, both in the present and over history. It also examines how cultures vary over space. The course also covers in depth the names of labels of specific places and geographical landmarks around the planet.

US History

This course examines United States history, beginning with pre-Columbian Native-American culture and concluding with the United States today. The course covers the intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social and economic history of our country. Students will be challenged to both develop a working knowledge of the key events in United States history, and to understand the context of events and their impact on American society. The following themes as related to United States history are explored: diversity and national identity; America's role in world affairs; economic opportunity; science and technology; women and political and social power; the role of minority groups in United States history; immigration, migration, and expansion; federalism; sectionalism; the growth and roles of political parties; individualism; the Constitution; the branches of the federal government; civil rights; and the social forces that shape American life. Students will read and think critically about different historical perspectives, and discover how different Americans have viewed their own society throughout history, as well as how Americans define themselves today.

Honors US History

This course examines United States history, beginning with pre-Columbian Native-American culture and concluding with the United States today. The course covers the intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social and economic history of our country. Students will be challenged to both develop a working knowledge of the key events in United States history, and to understand the context of events and their impact on American society. The following themes as related to United States history are explored: diversity and national identity; America's role in world affairs; economic opportunity; science and technology; women and political and social power; the role of minority groups in United States history; immigration, migration, and expansion; federalism; sectionalism; the growth and roles of political parties; individualism; the Constitution; the branches of the federal government; civil rights; and the social forces that shape American life. Students will read and think critically about different historical perspectives, and discover how different Americans have viewed their own society throughout history, as well as how Americans define themselves today. Their reading responses and papers will be expected to show a deeper understanding of and ability to synthesize the ideas through deeper writing and discussion.

AP US History

This course examines United States history, beginning with pre-Columbian Native-American culture and concluding with the United States today. The course covers the intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social and economic history of our country. Students will be challenged to both develop a working knowledge of the key events in United States history, and to understand the context of events and their impact on American society. The following themes as related to United States history are explored: diversity and national identity; America's role in world affairs; economic opportunity; science and technology; women and political and social power; the role of minority groups in United States history; immigration, migration, and expansion; federalism; sectionalism; the growth and roles of political parties; individualism; the Constitution; the branches of the federal government; civil rights; and the social forces that shape American life. Students will read and think critically about different historical perspectives, and discover how different Americans have viewed their own society throughout history, as well as how Americans define themselves today. This course will also prepare students to take the AP US History exam, administered by the College Board.

World History

To introduce and overview the history from prehistory to modern day. Students will explore the following themes as related to world history: power and authority, religious and ethical systems, revolution, interaction with the environment, economics, cultural interaction, empire building, science and technology.

Honors World History

To introduce and overview the history from prehistory to modern day. Students will explore the following themes as related to world history: power and authority, religious and ethical systems, revolution, interaction with the environment, economics, cultural interaction, empire building, science and technology.  Their reading responses and papers will be expected to show a deeper understanding of and ability to synthesize the ideas through deeper writing and discussion.

AP World History

This course covers five periods of world history (Foundations, 1000-1450 C.E., 1450-1750 C.E., 1750-1914 C.E., and 1914 C.E-present) in approximately equal emphasis, concentrating on the following themes:

The impact of interaction among major societies

The relationship of change and continuity across world history periods

The impact of technology and demography on people and the environment

Systems of social structure, such as class, gender, ethnic, and racial divides

Cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among and within societies

Development of political and economic structures and attitudes

Government and Politics

This course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  It includes the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It includes the origins and foundations of our government; the various institutions that make up the government; and the roles played by individuals, groups, and the mass media participate in or influence the operations of government.

Honors Government and Politics

This course  includes the study of basic concepts of government, and the history and implementation of the United States constitutional system. Students will identify the function and practice of the three branches, analyze the impact of federalism, and explore the role of the media, interest groups, and political parties in the formation of public opinion and the practice of United States politics. Students will have frequent reading assignments and will be expected to demonstrate a deeper understanding of course concepts in their written work and class discussion.   

Economics

This course is an introduction to the study of economics.  It includes the basic concepts of economics and economic systems, including microeconomics, macroeconomics and free enterprise.  In addition it investigates the governmental roles regarding monetary and fiscal policy. Finally it explores skills needed to be an empowered consumer.

Honors Economics

AP Microeconomics

 Advanced Placement Microeconomics is a course designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics as they apply to individual decision-making units, including individual households and firms. Students taking the course will spend time examining the theory of consumer behavior, the theory of the firm, and the behavior of profit-maximizing firms under various market structures. They will evaluate the efficiency of the outcomes with respect to price, output, consumer surplus, and producer surplus. Student will have an opportunity to examine the behaviors of households and businesses in factor markets, and learn how the determination of factor prices, wages, interest, and rent influence the distribution of income in a market economy. Students will also consider instances in which private markets may fail to allocate resources efficiently and examine various public policy alternatives aimed at improving the efficiency of private markets.  Students will learn to generate, interpret, label, and analyze graphs, charts, and data to describe and explain economic concepts.

AP Macroeconomics

The purpose of an AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.

European History

This course covers the history of Europe from the late Middle Ages to the present, with approximately equal emphasis place on the following periods and movements: The Late Middle Ages, The Renaissance, The Reformation, The Age of Discovery and the Development of the State, The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, The French and American Revolutions, The Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and Communism, World Wars, the Cold War, and the (post) Modern World.

Honors European History

This course covers the history of Europe from the late Middle Ages to the present, with approximately equal emphasis place on the following periods and movements: The Late Middle Ages, The Renaissance, The Reformation, The Age of Discovery and the Development of the State, The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, The French and American Revolutions, The Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and Communism, World Wars, the Cold War, and the (post) Modern World.

AP European History

This course covers the history of Europe from the late Middle Ages to the present, with approximately equal emphasis place on the following periods and movements: The Late Middle Ages, The Renaissance, The Reformation, The Age of Discovery and the Development of the State, The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, The French and American Revolutions, The Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and Communism, World Wars, the Cold War, and the (post) Modern World.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

Comparative World Religions

This course examines the impact of faith upon the lives of individuals and seeks to understand how religion functions in the lives of people in other cultures and in world history.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

AP Human Geography

The curriculum for this two-semester AP® Human Geography course consists of topics drawn from seven interrelated units of study outlined in the AP Human Geography Course Description booklet published by the College Board. The topics are as follows: Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives, Population Geography, Cultural Patterns and Processes, Political Organization of Space, Economic Development, Agriculture and Rural Land Use, Industrialization, Settlement and Services, Cities and Urban Land Use, Resource Management, Careers in Geography.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

Mythology

Mythology provides a large window through which we can view past cultures.  Since what we today call mythology was once the basis for the religion of many ancient peoples, some of the most important aspects of these cultures is included within the stories.  Therefore, by reading mythology, we can gain perspective on the beliefs and values of the cultures we study.  In this course, we will focus on the mythology of the Greeks, Romans, and the Norse.  We will read and discuss several myths from each culture from both primary and secondary sources as well as discuss modern interpretations to the some of the myths.  Topics of discussion will include, but are not limited to, the qualities and characteristics of heroes, the relationships between the mortal and immortal, and the afterlife.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

History of Science

This course is designed to increase the student's understanding of the major scientific and technical advances in western civilization from the Ancient World to the present. It treats the sciences and technology as being historically significant in them, and also as a part of the larger social and cultural framework. Major topics include: Greek natural philosophy; Greco-Roman technology; medieval technology and social change; the Renaissance and technology; the scientific revolution of the 1600s; the industrial revolution; evolution; relativity; and environmentalism. This course will also examine the effects of the accelerating pace of scientific change on society, economics, and politics.

 

This course is also an Academic Elective.

AP Art History

The study of art history allows students to discover anew the world in which they live. Throughout the year we will learn about how people have responded to and communicated their experiences through art, as well as the historic and cultural contexts in which it was created. Students will be welcomed into the global art world as active participants, engaging with its forms and content as they research, discuss, read, and write about art, artists, art making, and respond to and interpret art. This course will be structured around the big ideas and essential questions of the AP Art History Course and Exam Description. As part of the course, we will take field trips to the Carlos Museum at Emory University and the High Museum of Art. The big ideas and essential questions in the AP Art History Course and Exam Description are used as a conceptual foundation for the course. Students are provided opportunities to experience actual works of art or architecture. Using the big ideas and essential questions that serve as a conceptual framework for the course, successful students will understand how:

• Artists manipulate materials and ideas to create an aesthetic object, act, or event.

• Art making is shaped by tradition and change.

• Interpretations of art are variable.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

Pyschology

This course covers the major perspectives of Behaviorism Psychoanalysis, cognitive Psychology, Biological Psychology and Humanism.  Coursework will include readings on the nature of science, research methods, history of psychology, biology and behavior, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, infancy and childhood, adolescence, adulthood, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, psychological tests, gender roles, psychological disorders, social cognition, and social interaction.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

Honors Psychology

This course covers the major perspectives of Behaviorism, Psychoanalysis, cognitive Psychology, Biological Psychology and Humanism.  Coursework will include readings on the nature of science, research methods, history of psychology, biology and behavior, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, infancy and childhood, adolescence, adulthood, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, psychological tests, gender roles, psychological disorders, social cognition, and social interaction.

 

This class will also include supplemental readings from the DSM 5 as well as 3 additional papers (Topics to be determined.)

AP Psychology

This course covers the major perspectives of Behaviorism Psychoanalysis, cognitive Psychology, Biological Psychology and Humanism in preparation for the AP Exam. Coursework will include readings on the nature of science, research methods, history of psychology, biology and behavior, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, infancy and childhood, adolescence, adulthood, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, psychological tests, gender roles, psychological disorders, social cognition, and social interaction.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

Philosophy

This course covers the central ideas and major thinkers in the history of philosophy. While emphasis is placed on Western Philosophy, there is some introduction to Eastern Philosophy and other world philosophies, as well. The course covers the primary fields of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics.

Sociology

This course will introduce students to the sociological perspective. The course will begin by studying major theoretical foundations of sociology including symbolic interactionism, functionalism, and conflict theory, as well as the methodology used in the field. Next, students will look at the development of the self through the sociological lens, exploring topics such as emotions and impression management. Finally, students will examine a variety of group identities through the sociological viewpoint, including gender, race and ethnicity, and social class.

Electives

BFA Course Electives

Would you like to learn to play guitar? Ever wanted to write a novel, or your own movie? Maybe you're tired of playing video games, and you'd like to try your hand at designing them. Perhaps you want to explore world religions, or learn how to make jewelry. Or you'd like to work in a theater program that has sent graduates to the most prestigious undergraduate drama programs in the country.

Whatever your passion, whatever new thing you'd like to try, chances are you'll find an opportunity to explore it here at BFA. For a school with relatively few students, we offer an incredible array of electives. We want to see our students enrolled in engaging, challenging, enjoyable elective courses while they are studying here. We've found that when students are encouraged to follow their passions, wherever they may lead, they turn into more focused math students, more perceptive readers and writers, and more inquisitive scientists. They also turn into students who are eager to get up in the morning and come to school.

Academic Electives

Psychology

This course covers the major perspectives of Behaviorism Psychoanalysis, cognitive Psychology, Biological Psychology and Humanism.  Coursework will include readings on the nature of science, research methods, history of psychology, biology and behavior, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, infancy and childhood, adolescence, adulthood, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, psychological tests, gender roles, psychological disorders, social cognition, and social interaction.

This course is also an Academic Elective.

AP Psychology

This course covers the major perspectives of Behaviorism Psychoanalysis, cognitive Psychology, Biological Psychology and Humanism in preparation for the AP Exam. Coursework will include readings on the nature of science, research methods, history of psychology, biology and behavior, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, infancy and childhood, adolescence, adulthood, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, psychological tests, gender roles, psychological disorders, social cognition, and social interaction.

Philosophy

This course covers the central ideas and major thinkers in the history of philosophy. While emphasis is placed on Western Philosophy, there is some introduction to Eastern Philosophy and other world philosophies, as well. The course covers the primary fields of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics.

Mythology

Mythology provides a large window through which we can view past cultures.  Since what we today call mythology was once the basis for the religion of many ancient peoples, some of the most important aspects of these cultures is included within the stories.  Therefore, by reading mythology, we can gain perspective on the beliefs and values of the cultures we study.  In this course, we will focus on the mythology of the Greeks, Romans, and the Norse.  We will read and discuss several myths from each culture from both primary and secondary sources as well as discuss modern interpretations to the some of the myths.  Topics of discussion will include, but are not limited to, the qualities and characteristics of heroes, the relationships between the mortal and immortal, and the afterlife.

Health

This course offers a comprehensive approach to health education. It offers students the chance to learn important decision making skills, understand and promote teen conflict resolution, understand academic ethics, reinforce manners and courtesies, and understand and avoid teen pressures and bullying. It also takes a serious look at nutrition and diet, the medical mystery of AIDS/HIV, the addictive properties of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and factors that affect teen self-esteem.

Journalism I & II

This course covers a review of journalism history, the rights and responsibilities of journalists, news writing, lecture writing, editorial writing, and column writing. The study of journalism is learning how to transform strings of words into information that is legal, appropriate, appealing and accurate. The purpose of a survey course such as this is to understand the role of mass media in our culture, how it came to be, where it is and where it may be going. Also, how it establishes and supports all of our icons in sports, entertainment, fashion and the merchandising of products of all kinds. It is important to understand its impact on business and the economy and how it is used to influence political opinion, foreign policy, international trade and the arts.

Forensic Science

This course is an introduction to the principles and techniques of modern forensic science.

Animal Behavior

This course is an introduction to the study of animal behavior.  It will range from the history of animal behavior through the changing view of behavior in the twenty-first century. For each unit there will be a lab, video or extra readings (sometimes all three.)

Comparative World Religions

This course examines the impact of faith upon the lives of individuals and seeks to understand how religion functions in the lives of people in other cultures and in world history.

History of Science

This course is designed to increase the student's understanding of the major scientific and technical advances in western civilization from the Ancient World to the present. It treats the sciences and technology as being historically significant in them, and also as a part of the larger social and cultural framework. Major topics include: Greek natural philosophy; Greco-Roman technology; medieval technology and social change; the Renaissance and technology; the scientific revolution of the 1600s; the industrial revolution; evolution; relativity; and environmentalism. This course will also examine the effects of the accelerating pace of scientific change on society, economics, and politics.

AP Human Geography

The curriculum for this two-semester AP® Human Geography course consists of topics drawn from seven interrelated units of study outlined in the AP Human Geography Course Description booklet published by the College Board. The topics are as follows: Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives, Population Geography, Cultural Patterns and Processes, Political Organization of Space, Economic Development, Agriculture and Rural Land Use, Industrialization, Settlement and Services, Cities and Urban Land Use, Resource Management, Careers in Geography.

AP European History

This course covers the history of Europe from the late Middle Ages to the present, with approximately equal emphasis place on the following periods and movements: The Late Middle Ages, The Renaissance, The Reformation, The Age of Discovery and the Development of the State, The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, The French and American Revolutions, The Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and Communism, World Wars, the Cold War, and the (post) Modern World.

Marketing I & II

This course is an overview of strategic marketing. It includes an in-depth study of the marketing concepts of product development, price, promotion, and distribution. The teaching method is case studies.

Investing, Banking, and Insurance

This is an introductory course in banking, which is about funneling cash from the people who have it, to the people who need it. We will also examine insurance and how to use it to manage risk.  Finally, we will discuss investing and building a profitable portfolio using stocks, bonds, exchange traded funds, and initial public offerings.

Film Studies I and II

This course teaches students to extract relevant information from media through watching, discussing, and writing about films. Film studies is an intro level course, and helps students develop skills relevant to English Literature and writing courses.

Art

Photography

This course is a basic design and techniques course to familiarize students with the beginning photographic skills and language as well as enhance visual thinking skills.  Students will use various pinhole cameras and 35mm cameras to produce photographs which can be enlarged, hand colored, sepia, and blue toned.

Dark Room Photography

Darkroom photography is a beginner class that introduces students to the basics of using different cameras, including pinhole and SLR.  Students will explore how to use aperture, shutter speed and lenses to create artistic photographs. Students will learn how to roll film into a light tight canister, develop film and use an enlarger to make contact prints and prints from negatives.   Students will also learn proper mixing, storing and disposing of photographic chemicals.

Painting I-IV

Painting explores color theory and basic painting materials & techniques with an emphasis on the development of visual perception. Students will utilize the elements of art and the principles of design as they experiment with watercolor, gouache, acrylic, and/or oil paints.

Drawing I-IV

Drawing explores basic drawing skills and the development of visual perception. Students will develop proficiency in the elements of art and the principles of design.

 

Sculpture I & II

An introduction sculptural concepts, processes, and materials.  Relief, subtractive, and additive processes can be explored while being exposed to historical and contemporary sculptors and techniques

Metal and Jewelry Design

This course is a design and techniques course to familiarize students with the beginning metalworking skills of piercing, filing, cutting , riveting, soldering, and polishing various metals.  Emphasis will also be placed on enhancing visual thinking, craftsmanship, and learning necessary vocabulary.

Ceramics I & II

This course is a basic design and techniques course to familiarize students with the beginning hand building skills of p inch, coil and slab processes, to enhance visual thinking, and learn necessary vocabulary.

Applied Lessons in Musical Instruments

Students will learn a rounded, technical, and creative approach to playing a musical instrument of their choice. Lessons are typically tailored to a student’s interests and tastes as much as possible, while still addressing the most immediately beneficial aspects of music making. Beginning students will focus on fundamentals, and address any harmful habits they may have incurred in absence of instruction. As a student progresses, they will focus on more and more technical aspects of music making, and will increasingly be able to work independently. Reading and music literacy will be strongly promoted and applied at all levels of entry.

Music Theory

Students will learn the most commonly used and directly applied aspects of music theory, individually or in a small group setting. There will be a strong emphasis on “practical theory”, or theory that applies directly to performance on any instrument, and applies universally. There will also be a strong emphasis on ensuring that students are prepared adequately for any barrier exams or auditions they might encounter, should they choose to pursue music studies at a college level. Additionally, there will be strong emphasis on ear training, as well as sight singing.

Popular Music Ensemble

Students will perform popular selections from the American musical catalogue in a group setting. Students will perform on the instrument of their choice. An emphasis will be placed on communication and discipline among other musicians. Regular rehearsals, in addition to a culminating performance each semester, must be attended to receive full credit, though partial credit can be given in extenuating circumstances. Space is limited, and acceptance to the ensemble will be determined on a case-by-case basis, at the discretion of the instructor.

Introduction to Film Studies

This course introduces students to the basics of film analysis, cinematic form, and narrative structure and helps them develop skills to recognize and describe formal elements of film as both an art and an entertainment form. Students are also introduced to the fundamental principles of genre, style, performance, and storytelling. Course consists of five units in which students will view and analyze a mentor film and then write and shoot an original five-minute unedited homage film. Requirements for each unit include a film viewing, analysis sheet, film-maker biography report, short original script, and five-minute film work product.

AP Studio Art

AP Studio Art is an advanced level course designed as an inquiry based approach to art making. Students will demonstrate the synthesis of materials, processes and ideas at the first year college level.  Students will develop a portfolio based on physical works of art that demonstrate a high level of technical skill and higher level thinking. Students will also conduct a sustained investigation based on inquiry, practice and revision. The physical works and works from the sustained investigation will be submitted to the College Board as per 2019-2020 program specifications.

Computer Science

Intro to Computer Security

As security experts, we constantly make observations based on patterns and models to improve the security of whatever we are working with, whether we are working with software, technology, or even paper and verbal documents.  The world is full of individuals that are either too curious for their own good or wish to do harm, making security a critical component of today’s society and technology.  That’s what we’ll be doing throughout the course: we’ll be making observations, finding patterns, and using our experiences to understand where and how someone may intercept or interfere with a system.

C++

The goal of this course is to build and assure a solid programming foundation, providing the background and skills necessary for the student to move onto other higher level programming languages. C++ covers creating variables, functions, classes, boolean expressions, if statements, do-while loops, arrays, writing algorithms, tracing programs, testing and debugging programs.

Javascript

The goal of this course is to enhance the programming skills that the student already possesses and move the student into a more professional programming state of mind. Javascript covers creating variables, functions, classes, boolean expressions, if statements, do-while loops, arrays, testing and debugging programs, HTML tags, event handlers, dialog boxes, objects, core objects, and DOM.

Scratch

This course structure will teach students to create programs, input and output, common syntax errors, creating variables, data types, branching, program styles, functions, loops, arrays.

Python

A gentle introduction to basic programming concepts using Python. Python is a high-level, interpreted object oriented programming language with built in data structures and dynamic data typing. This results in programs that are typically much shorter than programs written in Java or C++. Python’s built in debugger allows the developer to inspect variables, set breakpoints and evaluate expressions in real-time. The underlying C and Java like structure and modularity allow for easy integration or linkage to existing programs in these languages. The combined features of Python are well suited for rapid program development leading to enhanced productivity

Java

This course covers program development, types of Java programs, explain OOP, define attributes, methods and events, manipulating TextPad, compiling Java programs, compiling and designing applets, building GUI, creating try and catch statements, creating event handlers, creating and implementing eternal classes, and creating constructor classes.

AP Computer Science

This course covers Object-Oriented Programming, an overview of Java Language Features, Classes, Objects, Inheritance, Polymorphism, Standard Classes, Arrays, Array Lists, Recursion, Sort and Search methods, a GridWorld Case Study.

Creative Writing

Intro to Creative Writing

This course serves as an introduction to prose fiction and poetry writing. The course focuses on a study of various forms and genres of prose fiction and poetry apart from, though not excluding, expository and persuasive essays. Literary works serve as models through analysis, application, and imitation. Composition exercises reflect an understanding of studied forms and an application of creative techniques.

Creative Writing, Poetry

This course serves as a complete introduction to elements of poetry writing. The course focuses on a study of various forms and genres of poetry, with extensive concentration on poetic technique. Literary works serve as models through analysis, application, and imitation. Composition exercises reflect an understanding of studied forms and an application of creative techniques. This course focuses on extensive and repeated revision of creative work.

Creative Writing, Prose Fiction

This course serves as a complete introduction to elements of prose fiction writing. The course focuses on a study of various forms and genres of prose fiction apart from, though not excluding, expository and persuasive essays. Literary works serve as models through analysis, application, and imitation. Composition exercises reflect an understanding of studied forms and an application of creative techniques. This course focuses on extensive and repeated revision of creative work.

Physical Education

Physical Education

Provides instruction in methods for competitive physical training in Cross Country Running, Basketball, Ultimate Frisbee, Golf and Tennis while focusing on the methods specific to attaining a healthy level of physical fitness. The programs also cover how to develop a lifetime fitness program based on a personal fitness assessment.  Personal development of strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, body composition and cardiovascular endurance are stressed. Includes additional fitness principles: nutrition, discussion of fad diets, weight control, stress management, adherence strategies and consumer information; promotes self-awareness and responsibility for fitness.

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